Australians breaking new ground

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Foam submarines, bees with backpacks and cyclone-proof housing made of recycled plastic. Just three of many life-changing inventions created, designed and developed in Australia.


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Professor Paulo de Souza with Mars Rover
Class: technology-style
Bees with backpacks: micro-sensors help solve global honey bee decline
Discover how Australian scientists are using pioneering tracking technology to save the world’s honey bees and protect global food security.
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Putrino_web2.png
Class: technology-style
Hacking Tech To Bring Healthcare To The World
Australian scientist David Putrino mixes physiotherapy, neuroscience and technology to develop low-cost healthcare solutions that are easily accessible for under-served people around the world. He has helped design prosthetic arms for refugees in war-torn South Sudan and developed affordable virtual reality rehabilitation devices that can be purchased online.
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Skyjuice_1
Class: society-style
A drop in the bucket
Twenty years ago, Rhett Butler saw many children in developing regions drinking polluted water. As a result, he developed a unique solution that led to the formation of Skyjuice, an organisation that uses Australian technology to provide world-class safe, potable water to remote, low-income communities for as little as 20 cents per person, per annum.
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Seabin, Co-founders Pete Ceglinski and Andrew Turton
Class: environment-style
Australian invention Seabin tackles ocean pollution
Two Australian boat builders have developed a world-first product to clean the world’s oceans, one marina at a time.
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Nev Hyman with village elder in Vanuatu credit Ted Grambeau Photography/Nev House
Class: society-style
Australian surfing icon delivers sustainable houses for communities in need
From surfboards to sustainable shelters, Nev Hyman’s latest startup is providing safe, affordable housing to some of the world’s most vulnerable people. His low-cost houses are cyclone-proof, built almost exclusively from recycled plastic and waste materials, and can be deployed to remote communities in a matter of weeks.
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Flow Hive inventors Cedar Anderson (left) and his father, Stuart
Class: business-style
Flow Hive: Honey on tap
A beehive that makes honey available on tap has captured the public’s imagination and set a crowdfunding record by raising more than US$12 million. Father-and-son inventors Stuart and Cedar Anderson, who suddenly have an international business to run, hope that bees, and the environment, will also benefit from their invention.
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Image provided by CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), credit James Gathany
Class: science-style | science-style | society-style
Australia's mosquito men
An international team of scientists led by Professor Scott O’Neill of Monash University has developed a natural method to reduce the spread of dengue fever across the tropics. He and fellow Australian, Professor Paul Young of the University of Queensland, are part of the global effort to beat and treat dengue, a disease which infects 390 million people every year.
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Zanetti_beach
Class: design-style
The Australian designer behind the burkini
Sales of the burkini have skyrocketed following attempts to ban the garment. Australian designer Aheda Zanetti discusses how she created the burkini and why she believes her designs give freedom and confidence to Muslim and non-Muslim women alike.
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Ron Allum at work, Image provided by Ron Allum Deepsea Services Pty Ltd
Class: environment-style
The man who built James Cameron a foam submarine
For decades, Ron Allum has been assisting directors to access and film in some of the most remote locations on earth. After developing an innovative material to allow Hollywood heavy hitter James Cameron to descend to the deepest depths of the ocean, Allum is now exploring how this material can be used in military, mining, scientific, and search and rescue applications.
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